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Although Blind John Davis was an active session pianist in the 1930s and 1940s, working with artists like Jazz Gillum, Casey Bill Weldon, Memphis Minnie, and was an architect of the Chicago blues style through his work with Big Bill Broonzy and Sonny Boy Williamson, Chicago native John Henry Davis, he remained relatively unknown in the U.S. throughout his career. Davis was a solidly professional player, and his approach embraced nearly all aspects of the American piano styles, from blues and jazz to straight pop and R&B, always with a bright, almost leisurely, sound. This collection from Document Records gathers up some of his early sides as a bandleader (his later recordings were mostly done in Europe, where he maintained a large and loyal following), and they show both his versatility and his remarkable ability to make everything sound offhand, comfortable, and slightly jazzy traits that figured in his mature style, which could easily be termed as lounge blues. Highlights here include the explosive yet controlled "Anna Lou Breakdown", the measured and gentle vocal on "No Mail Today" and the soaring and gliding "Magic Carpet". Davis was seldom flashy, so it is easy to miss the subtle artistry he brought to everything he played, and he remains one of the most unsung of America's blues-based piano greats. He is best known for his work with others but is reputed to have been a little disdainful of the blues. This wouldn't be surprising of an artist who was clearly versatile, even fairly eclectic, and who seems to have had a broad musical education (if not necessarily a formal one). He didn't disdain blues as material for his own records, although it is true that he may have been responding to the dictates of fashion rather than his own predilection
Although Blind John Davis was an active session pianist in the 1930s and 1940s, working with artists like Jazz Gillum, Casey Bill Weldon, Memphis Minnie, and was an architect of the Chicago blues style through his work with Big Bill Broonzy and Sonny Boy Williamson, Chicago native John Henry Davis, he remained relatively unknown in the U.S. throughout his career. Davis was a solidly professional player, and his approach embraced nearly all aspects of the American piano styles, from blues and jazz to straight pop and R&B, always with a bright, almost leisurely, sound. This collection from Document Records gathers up some of his early sides as a bandleader (his later recordings were mostly done in Europe, where he maintained a large and loyal following), and they show both his versatility and his remarkable ability to make everything sound offhand, comfortable, and slightly jazzy traits that figured in his mature style, which could easily be termed as lounge blues. Highlights here include the explosive yet controlled "Anna Lou Breakdown", the measured and gentle vocal on "No Mail Today" and the soaring and gliding "Magic Carpet". Davis was seldom flashy, so it is easy to miss the subtle artistry he brought to everything he played, and he remains one of the most unsung of America's blues-based piano greats. He is best known for his work with others but is reputed to have been a little disdainful of the blues. This wouldn't be surprising of an artist who was clearly versatile, even fairly eclectic, and who seems to have had a broad musical education (if not necessarily a formal one). He didn't disdain blues as material for his own records, although it is true that he may have been responding to the dictates of fashion rather than his own predilection
714298564723

Details

Format: CD
Label: DOCUMENT
Catalog: 5647
Rel. Date: 04/01/2022
UPC: 714298564723

1938-52 1
Artist: Blind John Davis
Format: CD
New: Available $14.99
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Jersey Cow Blues
2. Booze Drinking Benny
3. Alley Woman Blues
4. Got the Blues So Bad
5. I Love My Josephine
6. Anna Lou Breakdown
7. No Mail Today
8. Walkin' and Talkin'
9. My Red
10. Honey Babe
11. Telegram to My Baby
12. Your Love Belongs to Me
13. Day Will Come, The
14. Magic Carpet
15. Paris Boogie (Woogie Boogie)
16. O Sole Mio
17. Sunrise Boogie
18. Rockin' in Boogie
19. Everbody Got the Blues
20. How Long Blues
21. Home Town Blues
22. Davis Boogie

More Info:

Although Blind John Davis was an active session pianist in the 1930s and 1940s, working with artists like Jazz Gillum, Casey Bill Weldon, Memphis Minnie, and was an architect of the Chicago blues style through his work with Big Bill Broonzy and Sonny Boy Williamson, Chicago native John Henry Davis, he remained relatively unknown in the U.S. throughout his career. Davis was a solidly professional player, and his approach embraced nearly all aspects of the American piano styles, from blues and jazz to straight pop and R&B, always with a bright, almost leisurely, sound. This collection from Document Records gathers up some of his early sides as a bandleader (his later recordings were mostly done in Europe, where he maintained a large and loyal following), and they show both his versatility and his remarkable ability to make everything sound offhand, comfortable, and slightly jazzy traits that figured in his mature style, which could easily be termed as lounge blues. Highlights here include the explosive yet controlled "Anna Lou Breakdown", the measured and gentle vocal on "No Mail Today" and the soaring and gliding "Magic Carpet". Davis was seldom flashy, so it is easy to miss the subtle artistry he brought to everything he played, and he remains one of the most unsung of America's blues-based piano greats. He is best known for his work with others but is reputed to have been a little disdainful of the blues. This wouldn't be surprising of an artist who was clearly versatile, even fairly eclectic, and who seems to have had a broad musical education (if not necessarily a formal one). He didn't disdain blues as material for his own records, although it is true that he may have been responding to the dictates of fashion rather than his own predilection
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